5 Day Reading Challenge in February 2023 📚✨

5 Day Reading Challenge in February 2023 📚✨

Day 1️⃣

  1. The Feynman Learning Technique by FS Blog (19 mins)
    Knowing something is valuable. The more you understand how the world works, the more options you have for dealing with the unexpected and the better you can create and capitalize on opportunities. The Feynman Learning Technique is a great method to develop mastery over sets of information. Once you do, the knowledge becomes a powerful tool at your disposal.
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  2. Time management: do the things you actually want to do by Anne-Laure Le Cunff (6 mins)
    To achieve our goals, we need to be smart about how we allocate our time to different tasks and activities. What is urgent now is often different from what is truly important. Time management is not just about managing your calendar. It’s also about managing your energy levels, your relationships, and much more. So how do you manage your time efficiently so you can achieve what matters to you while attending to your responsibilities?
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  3. Mastering the Art of Letting Go by Leo Babauta (4 mins)
    The key to living a life of calm and purpose is the art of letting go. We often think the cause of our feeling bad is something outside of us or with ourselves, but it can actually be an idea we have in our minds that things should be different than they are. To free ourselves, we can notice when there's a difficulty, be with it without judgement, and let go of the mental conception that's causing the difficulty.
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Day 2️⃣

  1. Embrace the Mess: The Upside of Disorder by FS Blog (5 mins)
    A messy environment offers disruptions that seem to act as a catalyst for new ideas and creations. If you think about it, we try to avoid these same disruptions when we focus on being more “organized.” Messy disruptions will be most powerful when combined with creative skills. The disruption puts an artist in the unpromising territory—a deep valley rather than a familiar hilltop.
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  2. 6 Things The Most Productive People Do Every Day by Eric Barker (9 mins)
    The most productive people focus on getting rid of distractions, empathizing with others, and finding a balance between work and leisure. They also take time away from the workplace to boost productivity and creativity. Monks in monastic communities knew the importance of having a routine and doing physical labor to foster mental stability.
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  3. Justifying Optimism by Morgan Housel (5 mins)
    Optimism is often seen as a positive trait, but it can also be dangerous if it prevents us from accurately perceiving the pain and difficulties the future may hold. Reasons to remain optimistic include the fact that most good things happen as a reaction to a bad thing, the constant human desire to one-up past successes, and the generational knowledge transfer.
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Day 3️⃣

  1. Why Tacit Knowledge is More Important Than Deliberate Practice by Cedric Chin (15 mins)
    Understanding that tacit knowledge exists is one of the most useful things you can have happen to you. Once you understand that tacit knowledge exists, you will begin to see that big parts of any skill tree is tacit in nature, which means that you can go hunting for it, which in turn means you can start to ask really useful question when it comes to expertise, which is: that person has it; that person is really good at it; how can I have it too?
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  2. Overrated vs. Underrated: Common Beliefs We Get Wrong by James Clear (4 mins)
    As a society, we often overvalue unimportant things and undervalue the ideas and strategies that make a real difference. Here’s the author's take on a few common beliefs that I think we often get wrong. Overrated: Being busy. Underrated: Doing one thing at a time.
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  3. 10 Things That Steal Our Motivation—and How to Get It Back by Cath Duncan (11 mins)
    Motivation is essential for creativity, productivity, and happiness. Demotivation is a category of problems with many variations, such as fear, setting the wrong goals, lack of clarity, values conflict, lack of autonomy, lack of challenge, grief, loneliness, burnout, and fuzzy next steps. To get motivated again, you need to identify the real reasons for your unwillingness to move forward and take steps to address them, such as naming your fears, reviewing your goals, unpacking your values conflict, and creating clear project plans.
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Day 4️⃣

  1. Five common beliefs about note-taking by Fei-Ling Tseng (4 mins)
    "Writing can improve our thinking. I know it has improved mine. But do we know what parts of the writing process that helps us think better? Can it be done systematically? What are the traits of a good note-taking process that lead to better grasp of ideas and concepts? This has been my question for many years.” In the article, the author introduces some beliefs on note-taking that she carried for a long time, but that changed over time.
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  2. The Secret To Better Habits in 2023 by Ryan Holiday (8 mins)
    The key to better habits in 2023 is to think small and focus on the small habits that can make a big difference. It's important to be patient and understand that it will take longer than expected to see results. Prioritize the important things and protect your sleep. Create positive peer pressure by surrounding yourself with people who have the habits you want. Discipline now for freedom later and keep coming back to your habits when you mess up.
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  3. What Makes You Procrastinate (Which Isn’t Always a Bad Thing) by Pragya Agarwal (4 mins)
    Procrastination is an irrational form of delay that can lead to stress and anxiety. It is related to cognitive biases such as present bias and status quo bias, which can make us resistant to change. Personality traits can influence our propensity to procrastinate, and it is a universal experience. It can help us navigate difficult emotions, but can also be a barrier due to underlying mental health issues. Forgive yourself for procrastinating and understand individual differences to better understand neurodiverse people.
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Day 5️⃣

  1. Goal-Setting Doesn’t Work. Here’s What Does. by Luke Burgis (11 mins)
    We hear a lot about goal setting, but hardly anything about why we are so obsessed with goal setting in the first place. Many of us relentlessly pursue goals — which we take for granted as good — without pausing to ask ourselves whether we should. There’s a meta dimension to goal setting. What are the circumstances and environments out of which certain kinds of goals emerge? Where, or who, do we adopt our goals from in the first place?
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  2. The Pygmalion Effect: Proving Them Right by FS Blog (5 mins)
    The expectations people have of us affect us in countless subtle ways each day. People’s limitations can be stretched if you change your perception of their limitations. A lot of what we accomplish in life is done in groups. Individual success is often dependent on some degree of team success. Thus, we have a better chance of succeeding when we are around others who succeed.
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  3. Uncertainty Matrix: How To Deal With Uncertainty (And Gain From It) by Frontera (3 mins)
    Uncertainty can be a source of anxiety, but managing it better is a crucial skill. There are four types of uncertainty: known knowns, unknown knowns, known unknowns, and unknown unknowns. To deal with uncertainty, challenge known knowns, discover unknown knowns, mitigate known unknowns, and prepare for unknown unknowns by adding redundancy and increasing optionality. With these strategies, you can navigate an uncertain world and even gain from it.
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